The latest Rebillot Workshop:

"IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF ABRAHAM"

 

 

THE STARTING POINT

Have you ever felt an inner call to leave the safety of a familiar world and set out into the unknown, despite some lingering doubts in your heart? Have you had to balance your own call with that of another family member or friend? Have you ever felt you are being asked to sacrifice something that is dearest to you? Have you longed for reconciliation with someone from whom you have been estranged?
These are issues you can explore in this workshop, which was created over two years in 2006 and 2007 by Paul Rebillot and an international group, from Lebanon, Germany, Austria, France, Britain, and Ireland. Given a trial run with a small group in Germany in October 2007, the workshop is now being offered for the first time to a wider public.

 

THE PROCESS

We see the Abraham story as one which has a mythical quality bringing forth conflicting archetypes that lie within each of us. Our aim is to let you experience within yourself what the diverse characters in the story tell you about conflicting hopes and challenges, as well as about sacrifice and reconciliation. In the workshop you will be led through a creative group process to enable you to clarify your personal call, by means of meditation, dramatization and gestalt practices.

 

THE STORY OF ABRAHAM

It is a tale of a call into the unknown, of doubt and faith, of rivalry and jealousy, of separation and sacrifice, of mourning and, ultimately, the possibility of reconciliation. People in the Muslim cultures, particularly in the Middle East, see themselves as the physical or spiritual descendents of Abraham’s older son Ishmael, while the Jewish people and Christians in general have traditionally looked back to Abraham’s younger son, Isaac. Our hope is that this personal existential workshop will not only give the participants a better understanding of themselves, but may also contribute to the promotion of peace and mutual respect between people, perhaps especially between the diverse ‘children of Abraham’.